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Popular eatery in Dengkil serves excellent food at decent prices.

IT pays to know people who love good food.

Better still if the person is a well-known food blogger, with a million-hits on his website.

I came to know one such person called Sin Tai Lim.

He is a contractor who cycles and blogs in his free time.

Sin blogs at www.tailim.blogspot.com and has a huge following in cyberspace.

And his latest find is a makan place in Dengkil, Selangor, which I also visited with my wife Michelle and a group of cyclists after a ride in Putrajaya.

Sin took us to the Dengkil Seafood Restaurant which is located on the fringes of the town.

Later, I found out that it is actually located along the same row as Sin
Kee Restaurant which is famous for its Udang Galah and Steamed Fish Head dishes.

Some Chinese dailies have also highlighted that Dengkil Seafood serves freshwater fish dishes.

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The house special is the tofu.

Our group of 10 savoured some highly recommended dishes such as Steamed Ikan Tapah Head, Seafood Hotpot, Chieu-Phai Tofu (house-specialty beancurd) and two vegetable dishes.

I must say that this makan place is spacious.

It is larger than Sin Kee and the air-conditioned dining hall in this restaurant is a very conducive place for makan kakis to hang out together.

Okay, back to the food, I found the Steamed Ikan Tapah (giant river catfish) a popular dish (priced at about RM90 per serving).

The cook used chee yau char (pork cracklings) for the garnishing, something you can’t go wrong with.

I found the Seafood Hot Pot rather disappointing and overpriced.

The other noteworthy dishes at this makan place are the chieu-phai tofu and stir-fried pucuk paku (fern).

The rest of the dishes were just above-average.

The bill came up to RM350, working out to RM35 per head.

Considering the fact that we had fish, prawns and a seafood hotpot, I found the price quite decent.

This makan place (N 02 51.530, E 101 40.771) is located along Jalan Puchong-Dengkil and is open daily for lunch and dinner (except during major Chinese festivals).

 

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